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Taking the Mystery out of Going Organic
By Carol LeBeau
11/25/2013 10:35:32 AM


–FULL BIO
 

When it comes to food, these days, it’s all about going organic.  And that’s great.  Count me in!  But I must admit, navigating the maze of organic food labels, benefits and claims can be more confusing than an exercise in quantum physics!  

Is it just me?  I have a college degree but nowhere in my curriculum was there a course on “label language,” and much of it is simply indecipherable. Thank goodness, after decades of talk, the USDA’s National Organic Program has finally standardized the widely varying practices of an unregulated, grassroots movement.   The program ensures all producers play by the same rules.  What does that mean for you and me?  Official, clear-cut definitions of “organic” and its many wannabes.  

Here they are! (And if you lose this, not to worry. I’ve got the list posted on my fridge!)

100% Organic: All ingredients must be certified organic, and processing aids must be organic as well. The name of the certifying agent must be on the label, which may carry the USDA Organic seal.

Organic: Products must contain at least 95% certified organic ingredients.  The remaining 5% (except salt and water), along with any nonorganic processing aids (such as chlorine to wash packaging equipment), must be from a national list of substance the USDA has approved for use in organics.  The product may carry the USDA Organic seal.

Made with Organic: Packaging can’t include the USDA seal, but at least 70% of the product must be certified organic; nonagricultural ingredients must come from the national list.  The quality of organic foods is high even at 70%, experts say.
Organic Ingredients: Below 70% organic, the product can’t claim on its packaging that it’s organic, except to list specific certified organic ingredients on the information panel.

Natural: The USDA says that meat, poultry and eggs labeled with this word must have no artificial ingredients and be minimally processed.  But the term isn’t defined beyond those items.  Assume “natural” means “conventional.”

Fair Trade: Nongovernment organizations certify that growers received minimum prices and community support from buyers and followed specific environmental practices.  Standards are not as strict as for organic.

Free-range: Birds such as chickens are sheltered and have continuous access to the outdoors, along with unlimited access to food and water.  However, these claims are not certified.

Cage-free: Birds can freely roam inside a building or room with unlimited access to food and fresh water.  They’re without cages, but can still be packed very tightly, even when organic.

Grass-fed: Animals receive most of their nutrition from grass throughout their lives, but may also eat hay or grain indoors during winter.  Animals may still receive antibiotics and hormones, according to the USDA.

No Added Hormones: Already true of organic, so its conventional producers that tend to use this term, but there’s no certification for these claims.

Whew!  It’s still a lot of info…but at least these definitions are clear and should make buying organic a lot easier.  

Healthy eating!