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Aprepitant, FosaprepitantAprepitant, Fosaprepitant

Aprepitant Oral capsule

What is this medicine?

APREPITANT (ap RE pi tant) is used with other medicines to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by cancer treatment (chemotherapy). It is also used alone to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by anesthesia used during surgery.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • liver disease

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to aprepitant, fosaprepitant, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Usually, you will take your first dose one hour before your chemotherapy begins, and then once daily in the morning for the next 2 days after your chemotherapy treatment. This medicine may be taken with or without food. Do not take more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of these medicines:

  • cisapride

  • pimozide

  • ranolazine

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • diltiazem

  • female hormones, like estrogens or progestins and birth control pills

  • medicines for fungal infections like ketoconazole and itraconazole

  • medicines for HIV

  • medicines for seizures or to control epilepsy like carbamazepine or phenytoin

  • medicines used for sleep or anxiety disorders like alprazolam, diazepam, or midazolam

  • nefazodone

  • paroxetine

  • rifampin

  • some chemotherapy medications like etoposide, ifosfamide, vinblastine, vincristine

  • some antibiotics like clarithromycin, erythromycin, troleandomycin

  • steroid medicines like dexamethasone or methylprednisolone

  • tolbutamide

  • warfarin

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Do not take this medicine if you already have nausea and vomiting. Ask your health care provider what to do if you already have nausea.

Birth control pills may not work properly while you are taking this medicine. Talk to your doctor about using an extra method of birth control.

This medicine should not be used continuously for a long time.

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular check-ups. This medicine may change your liver function blood test results.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in heart rhythm

  • high or low blood pressure

  • rectal bleeding

  • serious dizziness or disorientation, confusion

  • sharp or severe stomach pain

  • sharp pain in your leg

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • constipation or diarrhea

  • hair loss

  • headache

  • hiccups

  • loss of appetite

  • nausea

  • upset stomach

  • tiredness

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 20 and 25 degrees C (68 and 77 degrees F). Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Aprepitant Oral capsule, Aprepitant Oral capsule

What is this medicine?

APREPITANT (ap RE pi tant) is used with other medicines to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by cancer treatment (chemotherapy). It is also used alone to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by anesthesia used during surgery.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • liver disease

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to aprepitant, fosaprepitant, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Usually, you will take your first dose one hour before your chemotherapy begins, and then once daily in the morning for the next 2 days after your chemotherapy treatment. This medicine may be taken with or without food. Do not take more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of these medicines:

  • cisapride

  • pimozide

  • ranolazine

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • diltiazem

  • female hormones, like estrogens or progestins and birth control pills

  • medicines for fungal infections like ketoconazole and itraconazole

  • medicines for HIV

  • medicines for seizures or to control epilepsy like carbamazepine or phenytoin

  • medicines used for sleep or anxiety disorders like alprazolam, diazepam, or midazolam

  • nefazodone

  • paroxetine

  • rifampin

  • some chemotherapy medications like etoposide, ifosfamide, vinblastine, vincristine

  • some antibiotics like clarithromycin, erythromycin, troleandomycin

  • steroid medicines like dexamethasone or methylprednisolone

  • tolbutamide

  • warfarin

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Do not take this medicine if you already have nausea and vomiting. Ask your health care provider what to do if you already have nausea.

Birth control pills may not work properly while you are taking this medicine. Talk to your doctor about using an extra method of birth control.

This medicine should not be used continuously for a long time.

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular check-ups. This medicine may change your liver function blood test results.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in heart rhythm

  • high or low blood pressure

  • rectal bleeding

  • serious dizziness or disorientation, confusion

  • sharp or severe stomach pain

  • sharp pain in your leg

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • constipation or diarrhea

  • hair loss

  • headache

  • hiccups

  • loss of appetite

  • nausea

  • upset stomach

  • tiredness

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 20 and 25 degrees C (68 and 77 degrees F). Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Fosaprepitant dimeglumine Solution for injection

What is this medicine?

FOSAPREPITANT (fos ap RE pi tant) is used together with other medicines to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by cancer treatment (chemotherapy).

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • liver disease

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to fosaprepitant, aprepitant, medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for injection into a vein. It is given by a health care professional in a hospital or clinic setting.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

This does not apply.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of these medicines:

  • cisapride

  • pimozide

  • ranolazine

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • diltiazem

  • female hormones, like estrogens or progestins and birth control pills

  • medicines for fungal infections like ketoconazole and itraconazole

  • medicines for HIV

  • medicines for seizures or to control epilepsy like carbamazepine or phenytoin

  • medicines used for sleep or anxiety disorders like alprazolam, diazepam, or midazolam

  • nefazodone

  • paroxetine

  • rifampin

  • some chemotherapy medications like etoposide, ifosfamide, vinblastine, vincristine

  • some antibiotics like clarithromycin, erythromycin, troleandomycin

  • steroid medicines like dexamethasone or methylprednisolone

  • tolbutamide

  • warfarin

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Do not take this medicine if you already have nausea and vomiting. Ask your health care provider what to do if you already have nausea.

Birth control pills may not work properly while you are taking this medicine. Talk to your doctor about using an extra method of birth control.

This medicine should not be used continuously for a long time.

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular check-ups. This medicine may change your liver function blood test results.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in heart rhythm

  • high or low blood pressure

  • pain, redness, or irritation at site where injected

  • rectal bleeding

  • serious dizziness or disorientation, confusion

  • sharp or severe stomach pain

  • sharp pain in your leg

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • constipation or diarrhea

  • hair loss

  • headache

  • hiccups

  • loss of appetite

  • nausea

  • upset stomach

  • tiredness

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

This drug is given in a hospital or clinic and will not be stored at home.


 
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