Surgery and Recovery

 

If You are Staying in the Hospital After Your Surgery

  • You will be brought to your hospital room on a bed or in a wheelchair.
  • You can expect your nurse to check on you regularly.
  • You may not be able to drink or eat right away.
  • Your nurse will help you order room service when you are ready to eat and drink again.
 

Pain Management

Remember that all pain is real. There are many ways to control pain. Ask for medication to control pain when you need it. Don't try to "tough it out," as this can make you feel worse.

Follow these medication tips to help control your pain following surgery:

  • Take your medication as ordered
  • Take your medication 30-40 minutes before you get up, move around, or go to therapy.
  • Ask about possible side effects.
  • Tell your nurse, anesthesiologist or doctor if the pain does not improve.
  • Know that it is rare to become addicted to the pain medication used in surgery.
  • Know that medication will reduce, but not take away, all of your pain.

We recognize that pain is an individual experience and not all regimes and plans suit everybody. Your pain will be assessed at regular intervals.
 

Your Role in Recovery

  • Do not try to get out of bed alone. Your nurse will help you when you first try to walk, as you might be at risk for falling. You may also have compression devices on your legs that help prevent blood clots.
  • You may have monitoring equipment that you may continue to wear during your hospital stay.
  • As soon as directed by your doctor, your role is to do mild physical activity, while still giving yourself time to heal. Rest when you feel tired.
  • Cough and breathe deeply. This helps to clear and expand your lungs and can prevent pneumonia. You may be given a spirometer to practice deep breathing. Your nurse will show you how to use the spirometer.
  • We will ask you to rate your pain on a scale of zero to 10. It is your responsibility to tell your doctor or nurse where and how much you hurt so your pain can be treated. Actively managing your pain lets you move in comfort.